The Snare of Service…by Arthur Pink

The main business and the principal concern of the Christian should be that of thanking, praising and adoring that blessed One who has saved him with an everlasting salvation, and who, to secure that salvation, left Heaven’s glory and came down to this sin-cursed earth, here to suffer and die the awful death of the cross, that His people might be “delivered from this present evil world” (Gal.1:4). “Praise is comely for the upright” (Psa.33:1). But to see the upright praising God is something which Satan cannot endure, and he will employ every art and device to turn aside the happy Christian from such blissful occupation.

Our great enemy is very, very subtil in the methods and means he uses. He cares not what the object may be as long as it serves to engross the believer and hinder his giving to Christ that consideration (Heb.3:l) and adoration (Rev. 5:12) which are His due. Satan’s aim is gained if he can occupy the believer with perishing sinners rather than the Lord of glory. The tactics which the devil uses with the saints are the same he uses so successfully with the unsaved. What is the chief thing he employs to shut out Christ from the vision of the lost (2 Cor.4:4)? Is it not getting them occupied with their own deeds and doings? Assuredly it is. In like manner he deals with God’s people: he seeks to get them engaged in “service” as a substitute for communing with Christ. It is the dragon posing as an angel of light, stirring up the feverish nature and restless energy of the flesh, to find some outlet that appears to be pleasing to God. Read More

Sermon: The Spiritual Blessing of Adoption (Ephesians 1:3-6)

The Spiritual Blessing of Adoption

Ephes. 1:3-6 (ESV)

 

    Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places,  [4] even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and blameless before him. In love  [5] he predestined us for adoption through Jesus Christ, according to the purpose of his will,  [6] to the praise of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved. 

The Apostle Paul begins the letter to the Ephesian Church with worship. Paul writes May the God and Father of our Lord be glorified, may God be highly exalted

He is worshipping God because of all the benefits God has given Paul and also given the Church. That is exactly why we should worship God. He has done so much for His people that He alone deserves to be worshipped.

 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, 

The best way to understand this verse is to see it as a statement the Apostle makes. He makes this blanket proclamation and then he spends the next ten verses showing us just how much we are blessed in Christ. He is going to elaborate on what he means by who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, 

God has given the Church every spiritual blessing. In other words, Read More

Sermon: Reason to Rejoice (Ephesians 1:1-2)

Reason to Rejoice

 

Ephes. 1:1-2 (ESV) 

    Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God,To the saints who are in Ephesus, and are faithful in Christ Jesus: [2] Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

As we begin the Book of Ephesians, I want us to make sure we get it right. When we’re done with the book, we should be living more like the way God wants us to live based on the truths given to us in the book. God reveals to His children truths through His written Word. Don’t wait for some mystical word from God, we have all we need in the written pages of His Holy Word…the Bible.

Paul highlights three main points throughout the book. These main points help us understand his purpose for writing:

1. He wants to show that God has brought together Jew and Gentile to form a new group, the church. In God’s sight there is no longer Jew and Greek but believers of all races that make up the Church. Jews and Greeks are now brought together through the blood of Jesus and reconciled to God. It would be wrong to think that there is going to be some great revival of national Israel and that the Jewish Nation would somehow experience a revival apart from the institution of the Church. Christ died for the church not for Israel.

2. Christ’s triumph over the powers of darkness on behalf of the church and how the Holy Spirit plays a key role in that.

3. Christian behavior that reflects unity in the body of Christ…the Church.

So, Ephesians is all about the work of Christ on behalf of the Church. I thought it would be very fitting to begin here as a new church plant to learn together the value Jesus places on His Church.

To take the truths of Ephesians into our hearts and to live them out daily will change our lives forever. We truly have Reason to Rejoice.

I. Paul Has Reason to Rejoice (Eph. 1:1a)

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, Read More

Sermon: Paul’s Encounter With Christ (Acts 9)

From a Ravenous Wolf to a Loving Shepherd

Paul’s Encounter with Christ

Acts 9:1-22

Acts 9:1-22 (ESV) 

    But Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest  [2] and asked him for letters to the synagogues at Damascus, so that if he found any belonging to the Way, men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem.  [3] Now as he went on his way, he approached Damascus, and suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him.  [4] And falling to the ground he heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?”  [5] And he said, “Who are you, Lord?” And he said, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.  [6] But rise and enter the city, and you will be told what you are to do.”  [7] The men who were traveling with him stood speechless, hearing the voice but seeing no one.  [8] Saul rose from the ground, and although his eyes were opened, he saw nothing. So they led him by the hand and brought him into Damascus.  [9] And for three days he was without sight, and neither ate nor drank.

    [10] Now there was a disciple at Damascus named Ananias. The Lord said to him in a vision, “Ananias.” And he said, “Here I am, Lord.”  [11] And the Lord said to him, “Rise and go to the street called Straight, and at the house of Judas look for a man of Tarsus named Saul, for behold, he is praying,  [12] and he has seen in a vision a man named Ananias come in and lay his hands on him so that he might regain his sight.”  [13] But Ananias answered, “Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much evil he has done to your saints at Jerusalem.  [14] And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name.”  [15] But the Lord said to him, “Go, for he is a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel.  [16] For I will show him how much he must suffer for the sake of my name.”  [17] So Ananias departed and entered the house. And laying his hands on him he said, “Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus who appeared to you on the road by which you came has sent me so that you may regain your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.”  [18] And immediately something like scales fell from his eyes, and he regained his sight. Then he rose and was baptized;  [19] and taking food, he was strengthened.

For some days he was with the disciples at Damascus.  [20] And immediately he proclaimed Jesus in the synagogues, saying, “He is the Son of God.”  [21] And all who heard him were amazed and said, “Is not this the man who made havoc in Jerusalem of those who called upon this name? And has he not come here for this purpose, to bring them bound before the chief priests?”  [22] But Saul increased all the more in strength, and confounded the Jews who lived in Damascus by proving that Jesus was the Christ.

1. The Condition of Paul’s Heart (9:1-2)

But Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest  [2] and asked him for letters to the synagogues at Damascus, so that if he found any belonging to the Way, men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem. 

Luke gives us a brief history of Paul’s attitude toward those of the Way.  He shows just how much Paul wanted to stamp out Christianity.

But Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord

He is filled with violence against them. Yet we know from Ephesians 1:4 that God had chosen Paul to be one of His own before the foundation of the world. The time for Paul’s conversion had come.

John Calvin compares Paul to a mad wolf searching violently for prey.  At just the perfect time Christ overpowers Paul and brings him to the ground.

((We see how well He knows the exact moments and opportune times for doing any particular thing. He could have encountered him earlier, if He had seen fit, in order to release the godly from fear and anxiety; but He gives a clearer demonstration of His mediation in closing the gaping mouth of the wolf only at the very entrance to the sheepfold.-Calvin))

Paul was merciless in his pursuit of Christians.  It didn’t matter to Paul he wanted them all wiped out.  Luke stresses men or women.  Even enemies in war show mercy to women and children but not Paul.  He wanted them all dead. 

Later Paul would speak of this in his letters:

1 Cor. 15:9 (ESV) 

    For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. 

Galatians 1:13 (ESV) 

   [13] For you have heard of my former life in Judaism, how I persecuted the church of God violently and tried to destroy it. 

1 Tim. 1:13 (ESV) 

    [13] though formerly I was a blasphemer, persecutor, and insolent opponent. But I received mercy because I had acted ignorantly in unbelief, 

Acts 8:1 (ESV) 

    And Saul approved of his execution.

And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles. 

Many scholars believe this persecution began by Paul himself.  He was responsible for the vicious persecution that broke out in Jerusalem. 

Trying to stomp out Christianity is like trying to smash Jell-o with a sledge hammer.  The harder you hit it the farther it sprays out.  Paul smashed the disciples as hard as he could.  Many found their way 150 miles to the north of Jerusalem in the great city of Damascus. 

Paul still wasn’t satisfied.  He goes to the chief priest and gets permission through signed documents to go and bring them back bound in chains to be executed.

But something happened on the way to Damascus that Paul did not intend to happen.  Paul met the Lord Jesus Christ, the very One he was persecuting.

2. The Sovereignty of Paul’s Conversion (9:3-9)

[3] Now as he went on his way, he approached Damascus, and suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him.  [4] And falling to the ground he heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?”  [5] And he said, “Who are you, Lord?” And he said, “I am Jesus,  whom you are persecuting.  [6] But rise and enter the city, and you will be told what you are to do.”

Here we see Paul’s conversion.  There are some very important things I want us to notice in this account of Paul conversion.

A. Paul’s Conversion was Sudden.

[3] Now as he went on his way, he approached Damascus, and suddenly a light from heaven flashed around him. 

As we share our faith, we should not be frustrated or despair because we are not seeing any signs of the Spirit of God working in individuals that we have been praying for.  Because of Paul’s conversion we can have confidence that the Lord saves, at times, very suddenly.  When we share our faith with others we mustn’t have any preconceived ideas about whether or not the Lord is working.  We must be faithful in sharing and leave the results to the Lord.

We must not think that our conversion is any less a work of Christ than Paul’s. Just because we didn’t see a bright light that knocked us to the ground doesn’t mean our conversions are any less spectacular. 

B. Paul’s Conversion was Unexpected

[10] Now there was a disciple at Damascus named Ananias. The Lord said to him in a vision, “Ananias.” And he said, “Here I am, Lord.”  [11] And the Lord said to him, “Rise and go to the street called Straight, and at the house of Judas look for a man of Tarsus named Saul, for behold, he is praying,  [12] and he has seen in a vision a man named Ananias come in and lay his hands on him so that he might regain his sight.”  [13] But Ananias answered, “Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much evil he has done to your saints at Jerusalem.  [14] And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name.” 

What is Christ telling us in Paul’s conversion?  He is saying that our Lord can save anyone He chooses.  When the Lord saves the chief of sinners, which Paul calls himself, He can save anybody.

That gives us hope when we evangelize.  We can share our faith with everyone and do it with anticipation of Christ actually converting souls because if Christ can save Paul…He can save anybody.

We also see another side of the story.

I can relate to Ananias and his reluctance.  The news of Saul of Tarsus had spread from Jerusalem.  This mad wolf, as Calvin portrays him, is coming up the road to destroy all who call on the name of Christ.  Ananias knows what Paul’s intentions are. 

Jesus, why not send an angel?  Why not speak to him again Yourself?  Why not send an apostle?  Why do you want me to go?  Have you ever asked that question when the Lord wanted you to go speak with someone?  Have you ever been a reluctant witness? 

What’s your response when you’re prompted to go and tell someone the good news?  Do you say no or do you go?  Have you gone lately? If you haven’t gone, why haven’t you?

Ananias had a good reason not to go- Saul of Tarsus would try to have him executed.

Ananias had a better reason to go- God commanded it.

He feared God rather than man. I pray we would all fear God rather than man.  The last time I checked no one is under the threat of being murdered because they shared the Gospel with their neighbor.

C. Paul’s Conversion was Planned

[15] But the Lord said to him, “Go, for he is a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel.  [16] For I will show him how much he must suffer for the sake of my name.”

Referring to this account John Stott writes,

((What stands out is God’s sovereign grace. He decided to save Saul of Tarsus and He saved him. Saul’s conversion is an example of what Paul wrote in Romans 9:18. Paul had surveyed the cases of Jacob and Esau and Pharaoh. One of his conclusions is found in verse 18. “Therefore God has mercy on whom He wants to have mercy…-Stott))

John Stott has it right.  What stands out in this passage is the sovereign grace of Christ. 

Conversion is a total work of God.  God did not ask for Paul’s permission to save him.  He didn’t invite him to walk an aisle or raise his hand. In God’s good pleasure and for His glory, God overwhelmed Saul of Tarsus with His blinding glory and Saul was converted exactly the way God planned.

Jesus had chosen Paul long before Paul chose Jesus. 

Galatians 1:15 (ESV) 

    But when he who had set me apart before I was born, and who called me by his grace, 

Saul of Tarsus did not resist God’s eternal decree and the grace God extended to him through His mercy to save him.

Some Christians don’t like the term ‘irresistible grace’ because it seems to imply that people do not make a voluntary, willing choice in responding to the gospel. It’s true that God does not save a person against their will. But the fact is that God changes a person’s will. He transforms them completely. Part of this transformation involves their will. God summarizes this process in Ezekiel 36:26f. He said,

“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws.”

At high noon on the road to Damascus Christ switched hearts on Paul.  He switched them and Paul’s will was changed.  Christ switched hearts so quick Paul didn’t even know what hit him.  He was given everything needed to be converted, he was given a new heart; he was given faith to believe. 

How do I know Paul was given faith?

Paul knew all about how conversion works.  In his letter to his brothers and sisters at Ephesus he writes:

Ephes. 2:1-10 (ESV) 

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins  [2] in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience- [3] among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind.  [4] But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us,  [5] even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ- by grace you have been saved- [6] and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus,  [7] so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.  [8] For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God,  [9] not a result of works, so that no one may boast.  [10] For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

Christ had prepared many things for Paul to do. 

As Paul approached the city of Damascus he was planning to wipe out the name of Christ.  He was on a mission to do away with all those Christians who carried the name of Christ.  Our Lord had a different mission for Paul.  Guess which mission Paul was faithful in accomplishing?

D. Paul’s Conversion had a Purpose

[15] But the Lord said to him, “Go, for he is a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel.

Paul’s mission would be the exact opposite of what he intended.  Christ had prepared beforehand that Saul the persecutor of the church would be transformed into her greatest missionary.

In a message that John Piper gave on this passage he closed his sermon with this truth.  He made the statement that the purpose God had in Paul’s conversion is expressed by Paul himself.  It is for us that Saul of Tarsus was converted. I want you to take this very personally as we close. God had you in view when he chose Paul and saved him by sovereign grace.

1 Tim. 1:15-16 (ESV) 

The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost.  [16] But I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience as an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life. 

If you believe on Jesus for eternal life–or if you may yet believe on him for eternal life–Paul’s conversion is for your sake. It is to make Christ’s immense “longsuffering” vivid for you. Paul’s pre-conversion life was a long, long trial to Jesus. “Why do you persecute me?” Jesus asked. “Your life of unbelief and rebellion is a persecution of ME!” Paul had been set apart for God since before he was born. So all his life was one long abuse of God, and one long rejection and mockery of Jesus who loved him.

That is why Paul says his conversion is a brilliant demonstration of Jesus’ longsuffering. And that is what he offers you today. It was for our sake that Jesus did it the way he did it. To show us “the whole of his longsuffering” to us. Lest we lose heart. Lest we think he could not really save us. Lest we think he is prone to anger. Lest we think we have gone too far away. Lest we think our dearest one cannot be converted–suddenly, unexpectedly, by the sovereign, overflowing grace of Jesus.-Piper

What about us?  What about you?  Is there someone in your family, in your circle of friends that you think could never be converted?  What effect would it have if they were?  Would your family be different?

The conversion of Paul had a rippling effect that is still being felt.  Gentiles came claim Christ because God worked mightily through Paul.

Paul’s encounter with Christ radically changed him.  He went from a mad wolf persecuting the church to a faithful shepherd protecting the church from wolfs in sheep’s clothing.  He went from an attacker to a protector because Christ overpowered him with His grace.

Philip. 3:4-11 (ESV) 

    though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more:  [5] circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee;  [6] as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness, under the law blameless.  [7] But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ.  [8] Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ 

    [9] and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith- [10] that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death,  [11] that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.

 

 

 

 

 

A Call for Theological Triage and Christian Maturity

By Dr Albert Mohler          Tuesday, July 12, 2005

In every generation, the church is commanded to “contend for the faith once for all delivered to the saints.” That is no easy task, and it is complicated by the multiple attacks upon Christian truth that mark our contemporary age. Assaults upon the Christian faith are no longer directed only at isolated doctrines. The entire structure of Christian truth is now under attack by those who would subvert Christianity’s theological integrity.

Today’s Christian faces the daunting task of strategizing which Christian doctrines and theological issues are to be given highest priority in terms of our contemporary context. This applies both to the public defense of Christianity in face of the secular challenge and the internal responsibility of dealing with doctrinal disagreements. Neither is an easy task, but theological seriousness and maturity demand that we consider doctrinal issues in terms of their relative importance. God’s truth is to be defended at every point and in every detail, but responsible Christians must determine which issues deserve first-rank attention in a time of theological crisis. Read More

Our First Sunday Morning…

Brothers and Sisters,

I am excited to announce that Grace Reformed Fellowship will begin Sunday morning worship starting September 7.

Sunday mornings will begin with Disciple Hour (DH) at 9:30am. In this context the grade school children will meet downstairs using material from Children Desiring God (CDG). Adults and youth will join together for about half of the DH time. Together we will cover chapters from various classic Christian books such as Basic Christianity by John Stott or Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges. We will be using multimedia to accompany the various classes. Then at about 10:00am or so, the youth will go upstairs with Matt and Heather to further discuss and apply the lesson while the adults do the same downstairs.

At 10:30 we will come back together, adults and children to have a short time of fellowship over coffee, tea, and cookies. This will give us some time to encourage relationship building and just hang out. This will also be a time when we can pray together getting our hearts focused for worship. The worship service begins at 11:00am sharp with singing, prayer, Scripture reading and preaching.

I’ve decided to start through the Book of Ephesians on September 7. In this book, Paul teaches what the church is all about; it will be a good place for us to start.  Spend the next week or two inviting your family and friends to join us at church on our first Sunday morning.

Grace and Peace,

Pastor Brian

Sermon: Encounters with Christ: Levi’s Effectual Call

Encounters with Christ

Levi’s Effectual Call

Luke 5:27-32

 

**Scripture reading Luke 18:9-14

Luke 5:27-32 (ESV) 

    After this he went out and saw a tax collector named Levi, sitting at the tax booth. And he said to him, “Follow me.”  [28] And leaving everything, he rose and followed him.

    [29] And Levi made him a great feast in his house, and there was a large company of tax collectors and others reclining at table with them.  [30] And the Pharisees and their scribes grumbled at his disciples, saying, “Why do you eat and drink with tax collectors and sinners?”  [31] And Jesus answered them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.  [32] I have not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance.”

How sane would a person be to wait until they were well before going to the doctor?  “I’m alright now Doc, but you should have seen me two weeks ago.” Or what if someone said, “Boy just as soon as I get well I’m going to see the doctor.” That kind of thinking makes no sense at all.  Healthy people don’t go to the doctor; sick people go to the doctor.

That type of logic makes no sense in the physical realm but people often use a similar logic in the spiritual realm and think it makes good sense and it’s just as crazy.  They say, “When I get my life turned around, I’m going to become a Christian.”

In this text, we are shown how salvation comes about.  Notice there is no magical prayer, no coming forward, and no human initiated decision.  Read More