Sermon: The Antidote for Anger Matthew 5:21-26

Truth Taught- The 6th Commandment is far more reaching than murder.  It also includes being angry with someone else.

Introduction

Last week we saw Jesus build a wonderful case on how His coming affected the Old Testament Law of God.  His words, I did not come to abolish the Law or the Prophets but fulfill them speak of finality and filling up or finishing the Law.  His authority as God’s final Word where the Law is concerned can be seen as He teaches and interprets the Law of God correctly for us in the Sermon on the Mount. 

Also remember from last week as we closed we looked at Jesus’ command that if we are even to see the Kingdom of God our righteousness must exceed the Scribes and Pharisees…

Matthew 5:20 (ESV)

20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

For I tell you is key in looking at these next sections because they all start out with the here’s what you’ve heard but I tell you phrase…

So, Jesus is telling us how our righteousness can exceed the Pharisees’ righteousness.

Jesus does not address every section and every Old Testament command of course but what He does is give us a way of thinking and handling the Old Testament that is in line with what God meant when He gave the Law.  So, these examples Jesus gives us help to understand what God means and how we are to think concerning His Law.  We must realize that Jesus’ interpretation is correct and all others are wrong.  With unparalleled authority Jesus is the final Word in this matter and shows Himself as the pivotal point in all history as He tells us, now, I say to you…

In the text for today, Jesus addresses the 6th Commandment…

Exodus 20:13 (ESV)

13 “You shall not murder.

The modern day translations are more accurate here.  Thou shalt not kill is not an accurate rendering, but you shall not murder is.  This commandment is not speaking of killing in each and every circumstance but it is referring to murder and homicide.

For example it’s not sinful to kill in a war situation when one is fighting the enemy.  It’s not sinful to kill in self-defense; it’s not sinful for the authorities to execute a murderer.  These are few examples when killing is not sinful and does not break the 6th Commandment. 

Genesis 9:5–6 (ESV)

And for your lifeblood I will require a reckoning: from every beast I will require it and from man. From his fellow man I will require a reckoning for the life of man.

   “Whoever sheds the blood of man,

by man shall his blood be shed,

       for God made man in his own image.

So to simply say you shall not kill is not an accurate translation of the original Hebrew text.  You shall not murder is the accurate translation.

Christians are not to be pacifists.   We are to treat human life with great care because we are all made in God’s image and we are to be obedient to God’s commands as well.  For those who, for example, are opposed to the death penalty may speak of the value of human life.  They’re thinking mainly about the life of the murderer and his punishment.  What about the life of his victim?  In commanding the death penalty for murder, God is focused on the value of human life of the victim. 

That’s the interpretation of the sixth Commandment. 

I want us to see today how what God intended by this commandment is far broader than even the correct meaning of you shall not murder.

Prayer

Matthew 5:21–26 (ESV)

21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire. 23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

1.  The True Meaning of the Sixth Commandment

21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.

Jesus begins by telling those present that day about their ancient forefathers who had received the original commandment from Moses and who began teaching it way too narrowly.  For them, the idea was to not murder anyone because if you did there would be judgment.  The Mosaic Law also had the prescribed judgment required for murder.  The person who murdered someone had to appear before the court and a judge. 

The issue here is that the commandment had been interpreted so as to simply include the act of murder.  So, as long as you didn’t murder anyone then they were taught that they were righteous in that regard.  Murder, however, is the act but doesn’t include the heart of the person.  So, a person may not be an actual murderer but still be very far from God. 

Jesus is out to expose the inner workings of murder.  He’s out to expose the darkness of the human heart.  There is darkness within the heart toward someone else before the actual murder takes place. 

The one restraint society has to curb the number of murders is the consequences of committing that act.  There are some murders that do not take place because the potential perpetrator does not want to be arrested, go to court, go to prison, and perhaps in some states be put to death.  The fear of consequences is a hindrance to murder.

Jesus tells us that there are far more serious consequences for the things that take place prior to murder or even if a murder doesn’t take place these heart issues that are seen by God also have very serious consequences.  God judges us not because of the acts we commit but the heart issues we carry along with us.

22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.

What does Jesus tell us here?  There is a judgment from God for being angry with someone.  You may not kill them but simply being angry with them will bring God’s judgment.

Now the KJV wrongly inserts here, without cause.  This doesn’t appear in the best older manuscripts.  This confuses the meaning.  Jesus isn’t saying well anger is ok if you have a good reason to be angry with someone.  If you’re angry with someone you are in danger of God’s judgment. 

Jesus goes on and tells us that not only is anger wrong and brings one under God’s judgment but so does insults, slander and contempt.  Anger shows itself in these ways.  Shouting out at someone, you idiot, you’re so stupid, you fool are all in mind.  These are ways we lash out against someone in anger. 

You might say, at this point, well I don’t lash out like that and call people names so I’m not guilty of the type of anger Jesus is speaking about.  That’s how fallen sinners think.  If you have ever been angry with someone and kept it entirely hidden from everyone, God still knows and left unchecked you will be under God’s hand of judgment. 

2.  The Biblical Answer to Anger is Reconciliation

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

            A.  We cannot substitute ceremony for reconciliation

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.

I want to apologize are words that just never seem to come out of some people’s mouths.  Hey, I’m sorry will you forgive me?  Is not in their vocabulary or else their mouth cannot form those words.  Really, their sin of pride is too great for them to ever think they have ever wronged someone.  When a person is the center of their world world they will never say I’m sorry.  Jesus commands us to apologize and go to someone we have wronged to seek reconciliation. 

The context of Jesus’ first example is the worshipper offering his sacrifice at the alter in the temple.  Here the sacrifice was offered because of the worshipper’s sin against God.  So the sacrifice was because the person had offended God by sinning.  Jesus tells this person to stop everything and go seek reconciliation between the other person you have offended and sinned against then return and seek reconciliation between you and God.  God greatly values the forgiveness of sin that takes place between two people.   

Here Jesus is keeping the ceremony from giving a false sense of security.  He desires people to be reconciled with one another in real time and then, as in this OT example, offer the ceremonial sacrifice.  In other words, the sacrifice for sin is not an excuse for not making things right between you and someone else.  It’s like someone who may say well God forgave me or let’s not focus on the past but move forward.  No, Jesus says we must focus on the past and we must make things right and then the sacrifice, in this example, covers the sin but not while the sin is ongoing. 

If you have wronged someone or sinned against them, as a Christian, you are required by God to go to that person and make things right.  Do not think that because Jesus’ blood takes away our sin that you are no longer required to make things right with someone you’ve sinned against.

Luke 19:5–10 (ESV)

And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for I must stay at your house today.” So he hurried and came down and received him joyfully. And when they saw it, they all grumbled, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor. And if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I restore it fourfold.” And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

The salvation of Zacchaeus was shown when he began to think about how he would make things right between him and those he had cheated even though those exact sins were blotted out by the blood of Jesus.  This is one fruit of the Spirit, a person will begin to make things right between himself and those he has wronged.

The reality is this we have all wronged someone else and we are required to go to them to seek reconciliation.

            B.  Make things right before judgment is handed out

25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

In Jesus’ day if someone owed money to another person if the borrower defaulted he could be thrown into debtor’s prison until the amount was paid.  The problem was while in prison the borrower could not earn any money to pay back his debt. 

Jesus is stressing here the urgency to be reconciled to someone else.  Judgment is approaching and justice will be carried out.  Because of this, one should seek reconciliation.

            C.  In both cases Jesus wants us to act quickly

24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother,

25 Come to terms quickly

I pray you’ve noticed that in both examples Jesus stresses quickness in reconciliation.  Do not wait for the right time just go and be reconciled to your brother or sister in Christ.  Don’t put it off.  I’ve heard so many people say, I’ll wait for the right time.  The right time is the moment when the Holy Spirit brings it to your mind.  Now is the time to be reconciled. 

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go.

There are no excuses and no time to wait.  Go and be restored to your brother.

Application

Why is the biblical answer to anger reconciliation?  Because reconciliation takes away the reason someone may have been angry.  It’s the result of an offended party and the offender coming to terms.  There is no reason to be angry any longer.  It is God’s way.  He has reconciled with His enemies through the blood of Christ.

I’ve read so many counseling books and pamphlets on anger and anger management.  There are some good ones and then there are some not so good ones.  Many, while calling themselves biblical, don’t even mention what Jesus tells us here.  They say things like, anger comes from stress so what can we do to not be stressed.  Stress management is the answer.  The problem is we cannot do away with stress.  We live in a sinful world we all have certain demands placed on us etc.   What can we do to eliminate stress?   My answer is nothing!  Life has stress.  You cannot create an environment where there is no stress.  However, stress does not give us a pass where sin is concerned.  I was angry because I was under so much stress is a lie.  I was angry and stress exposed it is far more accurate. 

Reconciliation is the biblical answer…

If when I am angry or if I’ve caused someone else to be angry and I immediately go to them and seek to be restored and I do that quickly then that will be a great restraint to anger in the future because I don’t want to keep doing that over and over all the time.  God will use this as a means of grace for us because this is what Jesus told us to do and just the act itself causes me to think through how I treat others because a) I don’t want the wrath of God on me, b) I don’t want to have to keep going to others seeking restoration, and c) reconciliation is the act whereby God’s judgment is removed and anger is removed.

Jesus’ antidote for anger goes against the modern day notion that anger is something inside of us that we need to get out.  It’s not something inside of us but a manifestation of our sin nature.  Whether we show anger, keep it contained, or burst forth with angry words it is an act or mindset based on pride.  We think we have been wronged and that the world should cater to us.

Jesus tells us to go quickly to be reconciled to avoid God’s judgment.  When you go admit your sin and ask the other person for their forgiveness, even if on some level they have a part in causing your anger.  I’m sorry for my roadrage but you almost ran me off the road!

Go to the other person and go quickly.  Is there someone God has placed in your mind to go to and be restored?  Go and go quickly.

*Resources Used:

Matthew by D A Carson in the Expositor’s Bible Commentary

A Theology of Matthew by Charles Quarles

A Gospel of Matthew by France

Matthew by Craig Bloomberg

Matthew by Doriani

Matthew by Charles Price

Matthew by Leon Morris

Blue Letter Bible

The Antidote for Anger

Matthew 5:21-26

Truth Taught- The 6th Commandment is far more reaching than murder.  It also includes being angry with someone else.

Introduction

Last week we saw Jesus build a wonderful case on how His coming affected the Old Testament Law of God.  His words, I did not come to abolish the Law or the Prophets but fulfill them speak of finality and filling up or finishing the Law.  His authority as God’s final Word where the Law is concerned can be seen as He teaches and interprets the Law of God correctly for us in the Sermon on the Mount. 

Also remember from last week as we closed we looked at Jesus’ command that if we are even to see the Kingdom of God our righteousness must exceed the Scribes and Pharisees…

Matthew 5:20 (ESV)

20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

For I tell you is key in looking at these next sections because they all start out with the here’s what you’ve heard but I tell you phrase…

So, Jesus is telling us how our righteousness can exceed the Pharisees’ righteousness.

Jesus does not address every section and every Old Testament command of course but what He does is give us a way of thinking and handling the Old Testament that is in line with what God meant when He gave the Law.  So, these examples Jesus gives us help to understand what God means and how we are to think concerning His Law.  We must realize that Jesus’ interpretation is correct and all others are wrong.  With unparalleled authority Jesus is the final Word in this matter and shows Himself as the pivotal point in all history as He tells us, now, I say to you…

In the text for today, Jesus addresses the 6th Commandment…

Exodus 20:13 (ESV)

13 “You shall not murder.

The modern day translations are more accurate here.  Thou shalt not kill is not an accurate rendering, but you shall not murder is.  This commandment is not speaking of killing in each and every circumstance but it is referring to murder and homicide.

For example it’s not sinful to kill in a war situation when one is fighting the enemy.  It’s not sinful to kill in self-defense; it’s not sinful for the authorities to execute a murderer.  These are few examples when killing is not sinful and does not break the 6th Commandment. 

Genesis 9:5–6 (ESV)

And for your lifeblood I will require a reckoning: from every beast I will require it and from man. From his fellow man I will require a reckoning for the life of man.

   “Whoever sheds the blood of man,

by man shall his blood be shed,

       for God made man in his own image.

So to simply say you shall not kill is not an accurate translation of the original Hebrew text.  You shall not murder is the accurate translation.

Christians are not to be pacifists.   We are to treat human life with great care because we are all made in God’s image and we are to be obedient to God’s commands as well.  For those who, for example, are opposed to the death penalty may speak of the value of human life.  They’re thinking mainly about the life of the murderer and his punishment.  What about the life of his victim?  In commanding the death penalty for murder, God is focused on the value of human life of the victim. 

That’s the interpretation of the sixth Commandment. 

I want us to see today how what God intended by this commandment is far broader than even the correct meaning of you shall not murder.

Prayer

Matthew 5:21–26 (ESV)

21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire. 23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

1.  The True Meaning of the Sixth Commandment

21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.

Jesus begins by telling those present that day about their ancient forefathers who had received the original commandment from Moses and who began teaching it way too narrowly.  For them, the idea was to not murder anyone because if you did there would be judgment.  The Mosaic Law also had the prescribed judgment required for murder.  The person who murdered someone had to appear before the court and a judge. 

The issue here is that the commandment had been interpreted so as to simply include the act of murder.  So, as long as you didn’t murder anyone then they were taught that they were righteous in that regard.  Murder, however, is the act but doesn’t include the heart of the person.  So, a person may not be an actual murderer but still be very far from God. 

Jesus is out to expose the inner workings of murder.  He’s out to expose the darkness of the human heart.  There is darkness within the heart toward someone else before the actual murder takes place. 

The one restraint society has to curb the number of murders is the consequences of committing that act.  There are some murders that do not take place because the potential perpetrator does not want to be arrested, go to court, go to prison, and perhaps in some states be put to death.  The fear of consequences is a hindrance to murder.

Jesus tells us that there are far more serious consequences for the things that take place prior to murder or even if a murder doesn’t take place these heart issues that are seen by God also have very serious consequences.  God judges us not because of the acts we commit but the heart issues we carry along with us.

22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire.

What does Jesus tell us here?  There is a judgment from God for being angry with someone.  You may not kill them but simply being angry with them will bring God’s judgment.

Now the KJV wrongly inserts here, without cause.  This doesn’t appear in the best older manuscripts.  This confuses the meaning.  Jesus isn’t saying well anger is ok if you have a good reason to be angry with someone.  If you’re angry with someone you are in danger of God’s judgment. 

Jesus goes on and tells us that not only is anger wrong and brings one under God’s judgment but so does insults, slander and contempt.  Anger shows itself in these ways.  Shouting out at someone, you idiot, you’re so stupid, you fool are all in mind.  These are ways we lash out against someone in anger. 

You might say, at this point, well I don’t lash out like that and call people names so I’m not guilty of the type of anger Jesus is speaking about.  That’s how fallen sinners think.  If you have ever been angry with someone and kept it entirely hidden from everyone, God still knows and left unchecked you will be under God’s hand of judgment. 

2.  The Biblical Answer to Anger is Reconciliation

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

            A.  We cannot substitute ceremony for reconciliation

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.

I want to apologize are words that just never seem to come out of some people’s mouths.  Hey, I’m sorry will you forgive me?  Is not in their vocabulary or else their mouth cannot form those words.  Really, their sin of pride is too great for them to ever think they have ever wronged someone.  When a person is the center of their world world they will never say I’m sorry.  Jesus commands us to apologize and go to someone we have wronged to seek reconciliation. 

The context of Jesus’ first example is the worshipper offering his sacrifice at the alter in the temple.  Here the sacrifice was offered because of the worshipper’s sin against God.  So the sacrifice was because the person had offended God by sinning.  Jesus tells this person to stop everything and go seek reconciliation between the other person you have offended and sinned against then return and seek reconciliation between you and God.  God greatly values the forgiveness of sin that takes place between two people.   

Here Jesus is keeping the ceremony from giving a false sense of security.  He desires people to be reconciled with one another in real time and then, as in this OT example, offer the ceremonial sacrifice.  In other words, the sacrifice for sin is not an excuse for not making things right between you and someone else.  It’s like someone who may say well God forgave me or let’s not focus on the past but move forward.  No, Jesus says we must focus on the past and we must make things right and then the sacrifice, in this example, covers the sin but not while the sin is ongoing. 

If you have wronged someone or sinned against them, as a Christian, you are required by God to go to that person and make things right.  Do not think that because Jesus’ blood takes away our sin that you are no longer required to make things right with someone you’ve sinned against.

Luke 19:5–10 (ESV)

And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for I must stay at your house today.” So he hurried and came down and received him joyfully. And when they saw it, they all grumbled, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor. And if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I restore it fourfold.” And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham. 10 For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”

The salvation of Zacchaeus was shown when he began to think about how he would make things right between him and those he had cheated even though those exact sins were blotted out by the blood of Jesus.  This is one fruit of the Spirit, a person will begin to make things right between himself and those he has wronged.

The reality is this we have all wronged someone else and we are required to go to them to seek reconciliation.

            B.  Make things right before judgment is handed out

25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.

In Jesus’ day if someone owed money to another person if the borrower defaulted he could be thrown into debtor’s prison until the amount was paid.  The problem was while in prison the borrower could not earn any money to pay back his debt. 

Jesus is stressing here the urgency to be reconciled to someone else.  Judgment is approaching and justice will be carried out.  Because of this, one should seek reconciliation.

            C.  In both cases Jesus wants us to act quickly

24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother,

25 Come to terms quickly

I pray you’ve noticed that in both examples Jesus stresses quickness in reconciliation.  Do not wait for the right time just go and be reconciled to your brother or sister in Christ.  Don’t put it off.  I’ve heard so many people say, I’ll wait for the right time.  The right time is the moment when the Holy Spirit brings it to your mind.  Now is the time to be reconciled. 

23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go.

There are no excuses and no time to wait.  Go and be restored to your brother.

Application

Why is the biblical answer to anger reconciliation?  Because reconciliation takes away the reason someone may have been angry.  It’s the result of an offended party and the offender coming to terms.  There is no reason to be angry any longer.  It is God’s way.  He has reconciled with His enemies through the blood of Christ.

I’ve read so many counseling books and pamphlets on anger and anger management.  There are some good ones and then there are some not so good ones.  Many, while calling themselves biblical, don’t even mention what Jesus tells us here.  They say things like, anger comes from stress so what can we do to not be stressed.  Stress management is the answer.  The problem is we cannot do away with stress.  We live in a sinful world we all have certain demands placed on us etc.   What can we do to eliminate stress?   My answer is nothing!  Life has stress.  You cannot create an environment where there is no stress.  However, stress does not give us a pass where sin is concerned.  I was angry because I was under so much stress is a lie.  I was angry and stress exposed it is far more accurate. 

Reconciliation is the biblical answer…

If when I am angry or if I’ve caused someone else to be angry and I immediately go to them and seek to be restored and I do that quickly then that will be a great restraint to anger in the future because I don’t want to keep doing that over and over all the time.  God will use this as a means of grace for us because this is what Jesus told us to do and just the act itself causes me to think through how I treat others because a) I don’t want the wrath of God on me, b) I don’t want to have to keep going to others seeking restoration, and c) reconciliation is the act whereby God’s judgment is removed and anger is removed.

Jesus’ antidote for anger goes against the modern day notion that anger is something inside of us that we need to get out.  It’s not something inside of us but a manifestation of our sin nature.  Whether we show anger, keep it contained, or burst forth with angry words it is an act or mindset based on pride.  We think we have been wronged and that the world should cater to us.

Jesus tells us to go quickly to be reconciled to avoid God’s judgment.  When you go admit your sin and ask the other person for their forgiveness, even if on some level they have a part in causing your anger.  I’m sorry for my roadrage but you almost ran me off the road!

Go to the other person and go quickly.  Is there someone God has placed in your mind to go to and be restored?  Go and go quickly.

*Resources Used:

Matthew by D A Carson in the Expositor’s Bible Commentary

A Theology of Matthew by Charles Quarles

A Gospel of Matthew by France

Matthew by Craig Bloomberg

Matthew by Doriani

Matthew by Charles Price

Matthew by Leon Morris

Blue Letter Bible

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